Sunshine!

July 29, 2014 § Leave a comment

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By Menon Wethly
http://www.clique-chique.com/

Co-creating ; an ideal work place

July 28, 2014 § Leave a comment


In a workplace, a group of individuals come together to co-create something that is going to make a difference. Co-creation allows us to learn, contribute and grow collectively as a company. An ideal work environment is like a well oiled machine. Everyone has their own part in the team. Its fun to trust! Trust our co-workers and them being able to trust you. We bring our best self to the table and enable the group to bring theirs. When the group dynamic works well, everyone is more than productive. Productive, because we have fun while working. Productive, because we are creating value in what we do. I am excited to go to work everyday. My work brings me joy. The product we co-create is worthwhile and meaningful and will be a benefit to others. We are co-operative components, come together to co-create something larger than ourself, that will help others.

Leadership

July 26, 2014 § Leave a comment

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Dumb ways to die.

July 11, 2014 § Leave a comment

Dumb Ways to Die is a public service announcement campaign in 2012, by Metro Trains in Melbourne, Australia, to promote rail safety.

What makes a great city?

July 10, 2014 § Leave a comment

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2D + 3D… a conversation

June 29, 2014 § Leave a comment

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When Graphic Design embraces many design disciplines like architecture, interiors and landscape, they shape the idea of a place. These graphical elements are not merely for beautification, but define and discipline the space. All forms of graphic elements that exist in the environment, also called as Environmental Graphic Design (EGD) concerns with the visual aspects of communicating identity and information. This includes a signpost, bulletin boards, graphic ornaments on a building, the name plate on wall and all forms of writing on two and three-dimensional objects for eg. store displays, interiors and architectural facades.

Creative window displays will stop anyone in their tracks. As a mix of art, fashion, design and marketing, these displays have to quickly grab th comsumer’s attention and compel them to enter the store. A composition of design elements used as a backdrop, sets the mood and creates an environment in that little rectangular space.

In interior design, while spaces talk to its viewers, celebrating a unique language, making the walls a participant in the process. In architecture it interacts with the materials of the structure, creating an environment outside the building, thus contributing to the character of the street. Hence it affects the urbanscape.

Graphic design displaying information, helps identify the purpose and navigate within the public space. EGD is not only to inform but also to engage, entertain and beautify the environment. If not for graphic design, Times Square is merely an intersection.

In some cases, graphics can create optical illusions. Anamorphic typography is letters intentionally distorted from one surface to another. The user can have an immersive experience, being able to touch, feel and interact with type. Space is three-dimensional. It can be empty or filled with objects. It has height, width, and depth. Graphic design has the power to define and alter it and in some cases, create an illusion.

This concept challenges what some people consider to be conventional graphic design. Because ‘It is always more than just print.’

- Krutika Harale
AAS Graphic Design, Parsons The New School
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Truth.

June 4, 2014 § Leave a comment

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The Art Of Looking Sideways

May 29, 2014 § Leave a comment

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10 years ago, The Art of Looking Sideways by Alan Fletcher was published, a seminal book contemplating the differences between pictures as words (and vice versa), the pleasing incongruities and “serious science” behind perception, process and the imagination that fills in the gaps.

The passage that follows is taken from the book relating to a few of Fletcher’s original materials, but they are just a minuscule cross-section of the prolific references – a personal compendium of visual language. The late, very great graphic designer could draw literally, rationally and metaphorically on the history of all humanized communication to excellent effect, one such quote from Goethe used by Fletcher states quite appropriately: “He who cannot draw on three thousand years is living from hand to mouth.’”

On Tools:

“As his most famous statement had it, Klee took a line for a walk. It snaked, looped, wandered off, and turned back on itself as it made its fitful journey through the worlds of his invention. A line can run dead straight, be wildly crooked, nervously wobbly, make sensuous curves or aggressive angles. It can meander, wander, track or trace. Be a scribble, doodle, scratch, hatched, dashed, dribbled or trickled. It can be precise or fuzzy, hard or soft, firm or gentle, thin or thick. It can be smudged, smeared, erased – or just fade away. You can push a line, drag it, manipulate and manoeuvre it, make it delineate, accentuate, attenuate, emphasize. A line may be imperious or modest, authoritative or servile, brutal or seductive, passive or active, weak or strong, thick or thin. A line is born, and dies, in a point.” (Frank N. Furter, The Rocky Horror Picture Show, 1975)

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DREAM

April 24, 2014 § Leave a comment

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Cultured People

April 21, 2014 § Leave a comment

Anton Chekhov on the 8 Qualities of Cultured People

“In order to feel comfortable among educated people, to be at home and happy with them, one must be cultured to a certain extent.”

What does it mean to be “cultured”? Is it aboutbeing a good reader, or knowing how to talk about books you haven’t read, or having a general disposition of intellectual elegance? That’s precisely the question beloved Russian author Anton Chekhov (1860-1904) considers in a letter to his older brother Nikolai, an artist. The missive, written when Anton was 26 and Nikolai 28 and found in Letters of Anton Chekhov to his Family and Friends (public domainpublic library), dispenses a hearty dose of tough love and outlines the eight qualities of cultured people — including honestyaltruism, and good habits:

MOSCOW, 1886.

… You have often complained to me that people “don’t understand you”! Goethe and Newton did not complain of that…. Only Christ complained of it, but He was speaking of His doctrine and not of Himself…. People understand you perfectly well. And if you do not understand yourself, it is not their fault.

I assure you as a brother and as a friend I understand you and feel for you with all my heart. I know your good qualities as I know my five fingers; I value and deeply respect them. If you like, to prove that I understand you, I can enumerate those qualities. I think you are kind to the point of softness, magnanimous, unselfish, ready to share your last farthing; you have no envy nor hatred; you are simple-hearted, you pity men and beasts; you are trustful, without spite or guile, and do not remember evil…. You have a gift from above such as other people have not: you have talent. This talent places you above millions of men, for on earth only one out of two millions is an artist. Your talent sets you apart: if you were a toad or a tarantula, even then, people would respect you, for to talent all things are forgiven.

You have only one failing, and the falseness of your position, and your unhappiness and your catarrh of the bowels are all due to it. That is your utter lack of culture. Forgive me, please, but veritas magis amicitiae…. You see, life has its conditions. In order to feel comfortable among educated people, to be at home and happy with them, one must be cultured to a certain extent. Talent has brought you into such a circle, you belong to it, but … you are drawn away from it, and you vacillate between cultured people and the lodgers vis-a-vis.

Cultured people must, in my opinion, satisfy the following conditions:

  1. They respect human personality, and therefore they are always kind, gentle, polite, and ready to give in to others. They do not make a row because of a hammer or a lost piece of india-rubber; if they live with anyone they do not regard it as a favour and, going away, they do not say “nobody can live with you.” They forgive noise and cold and dried-up meat and witticisms and the presence of strangers in their homes.
  2. They have sympathy not for beggars and cats alone. Their heart aches for what the eye does not see…. They sit up at night in order to help P…., to pay for brothers at the University, and to buy clothes for their mother.
  3. They respect the property of others, and therefor pay their debts.
  4. They are sincere, and dread lying like fire. They don’t lie even in small things. A lie is insulting to the listener and puts him in a lower position in the eyes of the speaker. They do not pose, they behave in the street as they do at home, they do not show off before their humbler comrades. They are not given to babbling and forcing their uninvited confidences on others. Out of respect for other people’s ears they more often keep silent than talk.
  5. They do not disparage themselves to rouse compassion. They do not play on the strings of other people’s hearts so that they may sigh and make much of them. They do not say “I am misunderstood,” or “I have become second-rate,” because all this is striving after cheap effect, is vulgar, stale, false….
  6. They have no shallow vanity. They do not care for such false diamonds as knowing celebrities, shaking hands with the drunken P., [Translator's Note: Probably Palmin, a minor poet.] listening to the raptures of a stray spectator in a picture show, being renowned in the taverns…. If they do a pennyworth they do not strut about as though they had done a hundred roubles’ worth, and do not brag of having the entry where others are not admitted…. The truly talented always keep in obscurity among the crowd, as far as possible from advertisement…. Even Krylov has said that an empty barrel echoes more loudly than a full one.
  7. If they have a talent they respect it. They sacrifice to it rest, women, wine, vanity…. They are proud of their talent…. Besides, they are fastidious.
  8. They develop the aesthetic feeling in themselves. They cannot go to sleep in their clothes, see cracks full of bugs on the walls, breathe bad air, walk on a floor that has been spat upon, cook their meals over an oil stove. They seek as far as possible to restrain and ennoble the sexual instinct…. What they want in a woman is not a bed-fellow … They do not ask for the cleverness which shows itself in continual lying. They want especially, if they are artists, freshness, elegance, humanity, the capacity for motherhood…. They do not swill vodka at all hours of the day and night, do not sniff at cupboards, for they are not pigs and know they are not. They drink only when they are free, on occasion…. For they wantmens sana in corpore sano [a healthy mind in a healthy body].

And so on. This is what cultured people are like. In order to be cultured and not to stand below the level of your surroundings it is not enough to have read “The Pickwick Papers” and learnt a monologue from “Faust.” …

What is needed is constant work, day and night, constant reading, study, will…. Every hour is precious for it…. Come to us, smash the vodka bottle, lie down and read…. Turgenev, if you like, whom you have not read.

You must drop your vanity, you are not a child … you will soon be thirty.
It is time!
I expect you…. We all expect you.

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